Goodreads Book Giveaway WINNNER

Fireworks Show

I’m excited to announce the winner of the  AND I THOUGHT ABOUT YOU Goodreads book giveaway.

642 people entered to win the autographed copy.

299 people added it to their Goodreads shelf.

BUT

only 1 person won.

That person is…

Ann from Arizona.

Congratulations.

Thanks to everyone who entered.

If you get a chance to read AND I THOUGHT ABOUT YOU

please consider posting a review.

Thanks again to everyone who entered and for spreading the word.

Happy reading.

GOODNIGHT ARK Birthday Bash

Introducing……. drum roll…. please……

GOODNIGHT ARK‘s BIRTHDAY BASH!!!!

Goodnight Ark

I was thrilled when Laura asked me to document GOODNIGHT ARK’s birthday bash. That’s right, Saturday, September 6th was GOODNIGHT ARK’s coming out party. Many people gathered at our local Barnes & Noble to celebrate.

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There was a reading,

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and crafts,

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and signings.

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I couldn’t capture all of the magic, but hopefully you get the idea.

During the fun, I took a little “What’s Your Favorite Animal?” survey.  Elephant was the winner, followed by Tiger in close second. Here’s a clip of one boy’s response.

 

After the reading, and crafts, and signing, and surveys, we gobbled up the treats below to continue the celebration!!!

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I’m certain everyone slept well (not like the animals in GOODNIGHT ARK) after such a wonderful day. Thanks Laura, for letting me share in the celebration.

 

Laura SassiLaura’s poems, stories, articles and crafts have appeared in many publications including Highlights for Children, Cricket, Ladybug, Spider, Focus on the Family’s Clubhouse and Clubhouse Jr., FamilyFun, and Pack-O-Fun. She has a passion for playing with words and rhyming and is delighted that her first picture book, GOODNIGHT, ARK, published by Zonderkidz, a HarperCollins Company, and illustrated by Jane Chapman is out. She is represented by Lara Perkins of the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Laura writes from her century-old home in New Jersey where she lives with her awesome husband, two adorable kids, and a black cockapoo named Sophie. You can also find her on her blog, Facebook, and Twitter.

BOOK GIVEAWAY

Book Cover with Stickers

I’m really excited to be doing a Goodreads Giveaway for AND I THOUGHT ABOUT YOU.

And what’s better than a giveaway? Winning a giveaway! So enter here to win a copy, signed by the author and illustrator.

The beginning of school is the perfect time to do a giveaway for AND I THOUGHT ABOUT YOU because it reflects a universally shared sentiment all mothers have when they’re apart from their children, “I wonder what my child is doing now.”

One reader said, “As a working mother, I am thrilled to have found this book (which) helps forge the conversation and diffuse anxiety children and moms have about separating.” 

Don’t forget to add AND I THOUGHT ABOUT YOU to your Want to Read shelf! Giveaway ends Thursday, September 11th.

GOOD LUCK!

Tell all your friends.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

And I Thought About You by Rosanne Kurstedt

And I Thought About You

by Rosanne Kurstedt

Giveaway ends September 11, 2014.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter to win

Using Darlene Beck-Jacobson’s Debut Novel WHEELS OF CHANGE in the Classroom

I’m so excited to welcome Darlene Beck-Jacobson today in celebration of the launch (September 22) of Wheels of Change, her debut middle-grade historical novel.  I met Darlene at a NJSCBWI conference a couple years ago and was totally intrigued by the process Darlene and her idea went through. You see, she originally wrote Wheels of Change as a picture book. But after some urging from an editor she went back to the drawing board (or writing board in this case), did more research and turned her 1500 word manuscript that she envisioned as a picture book into a wonderful middle grade novel, rich with historical setting and multi-layered characters.  Since writing and education are my passions, I asked Darlene some questions about how teachers might use Wheels of Change in their classrooms, and if she could provide insights about her research process.

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  1. Tell us a little about how Wheels of Change came to be? The story sprang from two bits of family history I found while researching my family tree. My paternal grandmother’s father was a carriage maker in Washington DC at the turn of the 20th Century, and grandma received an invitation to attend a reception at the White House hosted by Theodore Roosevelt. She attended that reception with her mother and met TR. So my premise became: What would a girl do to try and save her father’s carriage making business at the dawn of the automobile…would she go all the way to the president?
  1. You must have needed to do a lot of research for the book -what were you most surprised about? I was most surprised by how helpful and generous people were about answering questions, sending photos, or lending their expertise on numerous occasions. The research was ongoing, so I was constantly sending e-mails or letters to get answers to questions like: What were the roads paved with in 1908? Which areas of the district had electricity? Where were the White House stables located? The list went on, and there was never a time when I did not get an answer to my questions.
  1. Do you have insights for students about the research process? Take your time, and don’t be afraid to look in unlikely places. I looked at old maps, cookbooks, 1908 Sears Roebuck Catalog, and in numerous books about American Culture at the turn of the 20th Century. DON’T just rely on the internet. Anyone can post things there; be sure you verify the sources and information you find online. Also, visit museums. They are treasure-troves of information regarding specific time periods.   And, talk to the experts. There are many people who spend their lives learning about American History or culture and are happy to share that knowledge with you. Just ask!
  1. How might teachers and librarians use the book in school? WHEELS OF CHANGE can be used as an introduction to a unit on The Industrial Revolution. There are downloadable resources at the Creston Books website, including study questions that tie into the Core Curriculum Content Standards for Reading and Literature for grades 3-5, a vocabulary list, and mother/daughter book club discussion questions.  Teachers can also download activity sheets, puzzles, guides to etiquette, as well as popular toys and games of the period.
  1. When you were writing the book, did you have any particular reader in mind? I just wanted to tell a story that would appeal to boys and girls.
  1. Will you be doing school visits? and if so how might a teacher, librarian, or school contact you? Anyone can contact me through my websiteon Twitter @dustbunnymaven or on my blog
  1. What’s you favorite passage/scene in the book? Why? One of my favorites is a scene in Chapter 3 where EMILY and her best friend CHARLIE are waiting for the pie judging contest to begin (Mama had Emily enter her first pie in hopes of teaching her proper lady-like ways). While they wait, Emily and Charlie enjoy a watermelon treat offered by Charlie’s dad, Mr. Cook. Here’s the excerpt:

“Have a nice piece of watermelon. It’s quite refreshing on a day like today.” Mr. Cook cuts two large wedges and hands them to us.

We step into the sunshine to enjoy the treat. I take a bite with juice dribbling down my chin. Mr. Cook was right about it being refreshing. Charlie grins and spits a watermelon seed. It lands on the lacy edge of my dress sleeve, stuck like a beetle in a spider’s web. I grin back at him and take another juicy bite, working the melon around my tongue until I capture the seed, take aim, and spit.

My first try falls pitifully short of Charlie, landing on his shoe. Fortunately, the watermelon is full of sticky black seeds, so I get a lot of practice. By the time I’m finished eating, I’ve landed a fair amount of seeds on Charlie’s shirt and trousers.

“I think I did pretty good,” I say, tossing the rind in a trash barrel.

“Not as good as I did.” Charlie laughs.

When I look down at my dress, it’s covered in black polka dots. I spin around and shake, trying to loosen them. Not a one budges. I flick off a few, but the warm sun has baked them onto the cotton, so it takes more than a flick to get them off. Just when I think I’ve picked off the last one, I find another.

“Mama is not going to be pleased.”

I’d like to thank Darlene for stopping by and for providing us with a snippet from the book and her process.  Take a minute to view the trailer and check out the next stop on the WHEELS OF CHANGE tour to find out all about the main character, Emily, at Nerdy Chicks Rule.

 

Darlene blog tour photoDarlene Beck Jacobson has loved writing since she was a girl. She wrote letters to everyone she knew and made up stories in her head. Although she never wrote to a president, she sent many letters to pop stars of the day asking for photos and autographs. She loves bringing the past to life in stories such as WHEELS OF CHANGE, her debut novel. Darlene’s stories have appeared in CICADA, CRICKET, and other magazines. When not writing, Darlene enjoys baking, sewing and tea parties. She also likes hanging around forges watching the blacksmith work magic. She’s never ridden in a carriage like the one in the story, but hopes to one day. Her blog features recipes, activities, crafts and interviews with children’s book authors, and illustrators. She still loves writing and getting letters. WHEELS OF CHANGE is available from CRESTON BOOKS. ISBN# 978-1-939547-13-2. You can learn more about Darlene at her website. Check out her website.

Writing Process Blog Hop

This week I am excited to participate in an Author’s Writing Process Blog Hop. While the questions are similar to the KidLit Author Blog Hop I participated in a few months ago, since this Blog Hop wasn’t specific to KidLit Author’s I thought I’d participate.

BookFor this Blog Hop participating authors answer four identical questions and then invite additional authors to join in the “Hop.” I was honored to be asked by my friend and fellow writer Vanessa Coggshall. With two toddlers and a newborn, Vanessa seeks to balance the mom/writer lifestyle on a daily basis. She is currently working on a memoir which focuses on life with her three year old, Emmy, who was diagnosed with Williams Syndrome as a baby. Vanessa also just helped edit and publish an anthology written by parents, friends, and family members of children with Williams Syndrome. She blogs about her life experiences with her children and husband at Williams Syndrome Smile.

So now onto my answers…

What are you working on right now?

I’m working on a bunch of picture book manuscripts at the moment–some new and some troubled favorites. In addition, I also have begun drafting ideas for an early chapter book series. I’m also actively working on getting an agent.

How does your work differ from other works in the genre?

That depends on the piece. In some cases I’m writing about a familiar topic but from a different point of view. Or I’m writing about a universal topic but focusing in on a single moment in time that greatly impacts the character. For my early chapter book series I think I’ve identified a relationship that has not been addressed very much in the genre so I’m excited to see where that goes.

Why do you write what you do?

I have a passion for picture books. Always have. When I was teaching upper-elementary grades I used picture books to predominantly help students develop their writing–but what was most powerful was how sharing picture books with older students touched their lives. Picture books provide access to places, people, and emotions in real, imaginary, and wonderful ways.

How does your writing process work?

Depends on the piece. Sometimes stories just come but that seems to happen less frequently than it had in the past. Most of the time I come up with a title, or phrase or just a relationship I want to explore. Then I start drafting by writing down anything that comes to mind about the topic. Sometimes it’s all in note form and other times I just write it out. I share my drafts and ideas with writing friends and they help keep me on track. After I have a draft, I revise and revise and revise. Oh, and then I revise. When I revise I work a lot on word choice and how the words sound when read aloud. I also work a lot on the structure. Writing a great piece has so many elements that each one, at least for me, has its own challenges and therefore the piece often times dictates the process.

I’m excited to invite Ann Ormsby to continue.

AnnOrmsby RecoveryRoom Poster 16x24Ann Ormsby has a master’s degree in journalism from New York University and a bachelor’s degree in English Literature and Writing from Drew University. Ormsby is a freelance writer and the Fiction Editor of the ezine The Greenwich Village Literary Review. Her work has been seen in The Newark Star-Ledger, The Huffington Post, njspotlight.com, The Alternative Press, hackwriters.com and patch.com, among other venues. She writes on reproductive freedom and other public policy issues. Her debut novel, The Recovery Room, which explores the topic of choice, won an Honorable Mention at the Paris Book Festival this year.
Let the Blog Hopping continue! Happy writing and reading!

And I Thought About You: Free Book Give-Away For Mother’s Day

rlkurstedt:

I was a guest at Darlene Jacobson’s blog today. In honor of mother’s day I talk about how routines can help provide space so magic can happen —for life and in writing. You can enter to win the book-giveaway too.

Originally posted on Darlene Beck-Jacobson:

First, I’d like to thank Darlene for inviting me to her blog so I can talk about my book,And I Thought About Youin honor of Mother’s day, and to touch upon the importance of establishing routines. Book Cover with Stickers

Routines help us be present. They provide a sense of calm and comfort. But they also provide a space where magical things can happen.

I began this post discussing routines, because my book And I Thought About You was inspired by a bedtime routine my son and I created while we lived in Hong Kong. His bedtime routine was bath, books, and bed – not so out of the ordinary I’m sure – but inevitably between the books and bed we would discuss what we did throughout the day. One night, one of us – I can’t remember who – ended the discussion with “and I thought about you” (the magic).

At…

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Authentic Work

rlkurstedt:

I know, two reblogs in one week. I just had to pass this along. This is near and dear to my heart. Whenever I work with teachers I talk about the implicit messages and limitations some practices have on kids. This post is a MUST read.

Originally posted on Three Teachers Talk:

Last week I had the privilege of visiting several elementary school campuses around my area. It is always neat to go and see what other schools and other districts are doing. This time, all of the campuses I visited were elementary schools, and there is no question that elementary schools love to show student work. One thing that struck me as interesting was the types of work that I saw displayed. Take a look at these two images:

EXHIBIT A

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What do you notice about the two displays of student work? Any similarities? any differences?

The biggest thing that stuck out to me was that in Exhibit A, all of the student work looked exactly the same. I know you can’t read the text under each elephant, but it too was essentially the same on every page. I will disclose that Exhibit A was done by kindergarteners and Exhibit B was…

View original 319 more words